The 5 best things about being a woman in tech no one tells you about

Carla Notarobot
3 min readJan 3, 2020
Photo by Christina @ wocintechchat.com on Unsplash

When I began studying computer science six years ago, I wondered how the gender imbalance would affect my career in tech. We all hear it in the news: sexual harassment, “brogrammers”, gender bias, etc.

What we don’t talk about are some of the awesome advantages of being a woman in tech.

Disclaimer, your experience will vary. I finished my CompSci degree from an mid-west city university a little over a year ago — so, including internships, I’ve only been working in the field for about two years.

I also have a tendency to find a humorous silver lining in everything.

The bathrooms are spotless and practically always empty

Less women = less people using the bathroom. Simple math.

I love my privacy in the bathroom — don’t everyone? It’s hard to drop a deuce when there is someone chatting on their cell phone in the stall next door. When there aren’t many women in the office, the chances of getting a moment of privacy in the public bathroom are much higher — a highly underrated perk.

I guess it will wildly depend on where you work or study, but I have always had the luxury of a clean, private bathroom in my workplace. Although, I guess it is irrelevant now that I work from home.

Getting your friends into tech

Again, this will vary person to person, but I get so excited when one of my friends asks me a coding or tech question — especially web development or general infrastructure (Subnetworks, VMs, VPNs, proxies, etc). Customizing a tumbler page with HTML/CSS is the perfect “gateway drug” into tech.

I think a lot of people, women in particular, don’t get into tech because they think it is “too hard”. I really enjoy bridging the gap between “This is too hard, I can’t do it” and “This makes sense, I know what I need to do”.

I got way to excited when my little sister became frustrated with some massive Excel files and asked me if there was a way to automate what she was doing with code.

It is rewarding when others feel comfortable reaching out to you for help in a field they may have…

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